dominic-win_20160425_085639Dominic Lennard is a film scholar and lecturer. He completed a PhD in English (specializing in film studies) in 2009 at the University of Tasmania, where he later coordinated a variety of courses, including Popular Fiction, Literary Theory, 19th Century British Literature, and several film studies courses.  He also coordinated the first-year English program at the University of Tasmania from mid-2010 till 2012. His teaching experience additionally includes sociology, media studies, and numerous research and writing-focused units.

He is the author of the book Bad Seeds and Holy Terrors: The Child Villains of Horror Film (State University of New York Press, 2014), several study guides for year 11/12 students, and regularly contributes chapters to edited collections on a variety of film-related topics (see Publications for more information). He is currently an Associate Lecturer in the University’s Pre-degree Programs, where he teaches writing, research and study skills, and critical thinking. He lives with his naughty but charismatic dog, Ahab (pictured), in Hobart, Tasmania.

From Reviews:

“[Bad Seeds and Holy Terrors] is impeccably well researched and presented. It holds its own at the top of film studies scholarship. Sprightly in its survey across key areas of cultural anxiety and able to draw on a range of lucid examples, Lennard produces sophisticated and complex extended analyses where necessary. A pleasure to read.”

—Prof. Linda Ruth Williams (University of Exeter)

“[Bad Seeds is] a bracing book . . . Lennard more than does [its subject] justice . . . Deftly organized, elegantly written, and graced throughout with numerous stills and frame blowups, Bad Seeds and Holy Terrors has something to offer both the lay reader and the scholar.”

—Prof. Gwendolyn Audrey Foster (University of Nebraska), reviewing Bad Seeds and Holy Terrors for CHOICE

“One of the strongest essays in the collection is University of Tasmania professor Dominic Lennard’s take on Christopher Nolan’s The Dark Knight (2008). . . .”

—David Young (Duquesne University), reviewing The Last Laugh: Strange Humors of Cinema for The Journal of American Culture (vol. 37, no. 1, 2014)

“[T]he chapter on Lacan, by Dominic Lennard, is a real disclosure. . . .”

—Prof. Jan Baetens (University of Leuven), reviewing Thinking in the Dark for Leonardo Reviews (March 2016)

“Dominic Lennard’s forward-thinking essay offers numerous insights into the complexities of the artist-hero in Burton’s work. . . .”

—Sean Matharoo (LA Review of Books/University of California), reviewing of The Works of Tim Burton for Science Fiction Studies (vol. 42, no. 3, 2015)